Appendices

 

Appendix 1: Online Survey 2013 - Forms




 

 


 



Appendix 2: Statistical Test Results

Gender v Churchmanship (Theology)

 

Crosstab

 

Churchmanship (Theology)

Total

Broad

Evangelical

Liberal

Low church

Reformed

What is your gender?

Male

Count

78

83

41

2

18

222

Expected Count

87.8

63.1

40.6

2.9

27.6

222.0

Female

Count

43

4

15

2

20

84

Expected Count

33.2

23.9

15.4

1.1

10.4

84.0

Total

Count

121

87

56

4

38

306

Expected Count

121.0

87.0

56.0

4.0

38.0

306.0

 

 

Gender v Attendance at Youth Organisations/ Groups

 

Crosstab

 

At a practical level do you keep a record of: Attendance at youth organisations/ groups

Total

Always

Usually

Occasionally

Seldom

Never

What is your gender

Male

Count

22

86

39

18

42

207

Expected Count

31.3

80.2

35.0

21.9

38.6

207.0

Female

Count

21

24

9

12

11

77

Expected Count

11.7

29.8

13.0

8.1

14.4

77.0

Total

Count

43

110

48

30

53

284

Expected Count

43.0

110.0

48.0

30.0

53.0

284.0

 

 

Chi-Square Tests

 

Value

df

Asymp. Sig. (2-sided)

Pearson Chi-Square

17.134a

4

.002

Likelihood Ratio

16.086

4

.003

Linear-by-Linear Association

2.441

1

.118

N of Valid Cases

284

 

 

a. 0 cells (0.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is 8.13.

 

Gender v Attendance at Adult Organisations/ Groups

 

Crosstab

 

At a practical level do you keep a record of: Attendance at adult organisations/ groups

Total

Always

Usually

Occasionally

Seldom

Never

What is your gender

Male

Count

13

64

58

28

47

210

Expected Count

19.6

59.4

56.5

31.9

42.7

210.0

Female

Count

14

18

20

16

12

80

Expected Count

7.4

22.6

21.5

12.1

16.3

80.0

Total

Count

27

82

78

44

59

290

Expected Count

27.0

82.0

78.0

44.0

59.0

290.0

 

 

Chi-Square Tests

 

Value

df

Asymp. Sig. (2-sided)

Pearson Chi-Square

12.658a

4

.013

Likelihood Ratio

11.831

4

.019

Linear-by-Linear Association

1.851

1

.174

N of Valid Cases

290

 

 

a. 0 cells (0.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is 7.45.

 

Importance of Statistics v ALL questions

As might be expected those who are positively disposed towards the use of statistics also tend to be more active in their use

 

 

How IMPORTANT are statistics for local church planning processes?

Pearson Chi-Square

Value

df

Asymp. Sig.

(2-sided)

Result at p<=0.05

What is your gender

4.607

4

.330

Not Significant

Which category below includes your age

16.752

20

.669

Not Significant

Theology numeric

21.702

16

.153

Not significant

Church Year Book for contact information usage

20.242

12

.063

Not Significant

Church Year Book for statistical information

21.684

12

.041

Significant

Blue Book for general information

15.084

12

.237

Not Significant

Blue Book for statistical information

23.985

12

.020

Significant

Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics

36.624

12

.000

Significant

Scottish index of multiple deprivation

20.270

12

.062

Not Significant

Local council website

27.118

12

.007

Significant

Scotland’s Census Results Online

41.266

12

.000

Significant

Statistics for Mission Data CD

38.367

12

.000

Significant

Statistics reported in Local/ National Newspapers

42.421

12

.000

Significant

Statistics reported in Magazines

28.995

12

.004

Significant

Statistics reported on Television/ Radio

36.372

12

.000

Significant

Church Year Book for contact information value

26.737

16

.044

Significant

Church Year Book for statistical information

25.377

16

.063

Not Significant

Blue Book for general information

32.146

16

.010

Significant

Blue Book for statistical information

33.791

16

.006

Significant

Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics

27.498

16

.036

Significant

Scottish index of multiple deprivation

26.545

16

.047

Significant

Local council website

19.654

16

.236

Not Significant

Scotland’s Census Results Online

33.950

16

.006

Significant

Statistics for Mission Data CD

21.255

16

.169

 

Statistics reported in Local/ National Newspapers

33.453

16

.006

Significant

Statistics reported in Magazines

40.935

16

.001

Significant

Statistics reported on Television/ Radio

32.708

16

.008

Significant

Church attendance outwith communion recorded

32.342

16

.009

Significant

Communion attendance

33.725

16

.006

Significant

Attendance at youth organisations/ groups

15.936

16

.457

Not Significant

Attendance at adult organisations/ groups

27.541

16

.036

Significant

Numbers attending special events

41.978

16

.000

Significant

SMART goals

30.874

16

.014

Significant

 


 

Appendix 3: Notes on Data Sources Referenced in Survey 1

 

Church Year Book:  The Church of Scotland Yearbook is an annual publication of Saint Andrew’s Press, the official publishing house of the Church of Scotland. The volume contains a range of information considered to be useful for Church of Scotland ministers and others.  The volume gives the majority of its pages to a simple contact directory of Church of Scotland congregations and ministers.  Contact information is also provided for the standing committees and Councils of the Church of Scotland with information on officials, as well as information relating to agencies and groups affiliated or linked to the work of the Church of Scotland.  There is a range of helpful resource information concerning charitable trusts, church law and procedures - such as those relating to church vacancies.  Towards the end of the book, there is a set of condensed annual church statistics which gives details of church membership; the number of church elders; the number of Guild members; church income; mission and ministry payments and the number of children under the age of 18 associated with the congregation.

 

Blue Book: The official Reports to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland are often referred to as the ‘Blue Book’ due to the colour chosen for it.  This two-volume publication is a compilation of material for information and discussion at the annual meeting of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland.  Volume 1 provides the main printed reports made available prior to the General Assembly whilst volume 2 is a digest of supplementary reports, including annual statistical tables.  Statistical information would include details of changes in membership numbers; office bearer statistics as well as the numbers of baptisms, weddings and funerals recorded. The publication includes a digest of the deliverances passed by the General Assembly of that year and any relevant legislative materials.

 

Local council website:  

Scottish Local Government consists of 32 elected councils which provide services to the people of Scotland - services such as education, social care, waste management, cultural services and planning (Scottish Government, 2017a)

 

Most council websites contain a range of factual information and statistical data relating directly to the local area.  Examples might include current and projected population figures for towns and villages, age profiles, health measures, housing information etc. 

 

Scotland’s Census Results Online: The General Register Office for Scotland published online details of the 2001 census, allowing for local, regional and national information to be examined and downloaded.  The relevant website has now been updated with information relating to the 2011 census at http://www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk/

 

Statistics reported on Television/ Radio/ Local/ National newspapers:  Media outlets report on statistics of public interest and also collect or commission information likely to be of interest to the readers or viewers of the particular publication.

 

Scottish Index of multiple deprivation (SIMD) (Scottish Government, 2017b). Originally this was a unique website which has become part of an integrated matrix of information provided by the Scottish Government alongside other Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics (see below).  SIMD gives information on relative poverty levels at data zone level – Scotland being divided up into 6505 data zones of similar size.  The index itself for 2012  

 

combines 38 indicators across 7 domains, namely: income, employment, health, education, skills and training, housing, geographic access and crime (Government, 2017).

 

Statistics reported in magazines:  Many magazines are produced for a specialist readership or for purely entertainment purposes.  This printed media item has, for the purpose of this survey, been differentiated from the other media channels.

 

Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics (www.sns.gov.uk). 

 

This site provides access to a wide range of information and statistics on health, education, poverty, unemployment, housing, population, crime and social/community issues in Scotland. The data was available at a range of different geographic levels (Scottish Government, 2013)

 

The original website has now been replaced by http://statistics.gov.scot/.

 

Statistics for Mission Data CD:  This data source was produced by the Church of Scotland Mission and Discipleship Council as a digest of statistical data from the Scottish Census of 2001.  The data is presented for each parish which was identified by mapping postcode level data.


 

Appendix 4: Online Survey 2015

 







Appendix 5: Parish Statistics – Kilsyth Anderson Parish




 


 






 





Appendix 6: Online Survey 2017 – Church Census

 


 

 


 

 

 

 


 


 

 

Appendix 7: Sample Media Coverage of the Scottish Attendance Census 2016

 

Sunday Herald (16th April 2017)

 

Reported with the headline:

Why Christianity is in Crisis in Scotland – Easter Sunday shock leaves clergy reeling as new figures reveal church attendance at all-time low.

 

Column inside has the headline

Scotland’s top clergy in state of panic over decline in number of churchgoers (Page 4).

 

Church of Scotland Website (2017)

 

The Church of Scotland website carries the headline, ‘Green shoots of growth as 390,000 Christians regularly attend church’ (accompanied by a photograph of a group of people outside a church smiling and holding colourful balloons)

 

Eighty per cent of church goers attend weekly services with almost half (45%) having attended their present church for over 20 years.

 

According to the latest Scottish Church Census (May 2016), a third (35%) of all churchgoers (counting congregational numbers against churches) were Evangelical, up from 26% in 1994, while another third (32%) were Catholic, with 16% Broad/Liberal, 13% Reformed and 4% Low Church.

 

Catholics and Charismatic Evangelicals recorded the youngest followers.

 

Although overall church attendance figures show a continued decline, the rate of such decline has slowed significantly, with some denominations and geographical regions seeing encouraging signs of growth. This is partly due to a significant influx of immigrants coming to Scotland and the growth of Pentecostal churches

 

Aberdeenshire, for example, has seen the number of its churches increase from 196 in 2002 to 228 in 2016, due to an increase of Polish labourers working in the oil industry and north east of Scotland.

 

More people (75, 350 or 1.4% of the population) are also now attending midweek worship.

 

Reverend Colin Sinclair, Chair of the Scottish Church Census Steering Committee and Moderator of the Presbytery of Edinburgh, said: ‘Whilst there are a number of challenges facing Christian churches in Scotland, including a broadly aging demographic and ministering in an increasingly individualised culture; these are similar challenges facing society at large both in Scotland and across Western Europe.

 

As a nation, we are seeing less attendance at various mass cultural activities. Only around 4% of people (213,108) visit the cinema at least once a week – a great deal less than the 390,000 Christians regularly attending Church (2013 Scottish Household Survey: Revised October 2015).

 

Indeed, in an atomised society to be part of a formal community worship is unusual and countercultural. Yet, the fact that many people stay and frequent the same church for over 20 years is an indication of the stability they bring to a community. As well as being sacred places of worship, our churches act as hubs for the community to come together and provide vital social capital to the wellbeing of our society.’

 

Rev Norman Smith, convener of the Mission and Discipleship Council of the Church of Scotland, responded to the report saying: ‘This Easter Sunday, hundreds of thousands of people across Scotland will gather in church to celebrate Christ's Resurrection and the faith which forms the foundation of their lives.

 

At the same time decline in church attendance has been well documented over the past few decades. In 1984 17% of the nation regularly attended church on a Sunday whilst in the 2016 census that figure had declined to 7.2%.  That percentage represents 390,000 people which is still a significant number of people.  In fact, more people attend church every week than go to the cinema or to football matches and more Scottish people are church members than belong to a political party.

 

These figures show that churches remain an important and relevant part of Scottish life. That is before you consider the enormous contributions that church members are making to communities across Scotland.  Church members are involved in everything from staffing foodbanks to running dementia cafes, welcoming refugees, youth work and much more. Church members also raise hundreds of thousands every year for charities here and overseas.

 

The reasons for decline in church going are many and have been well researched.  Changes in working patterns, leisure activities and family life have all contributed as has increasing secularisation. Within our society, Sunday is increasingly no longer seen as Sabbath or the Lord’s day but another day to cram full of activity.  In addition, church-going used to be something you learned from your parents, so the pattern of going to church was instilled in you as a child.  However, as each generation has moved further and further away from that inherited pattern less people have learned about going to church. All of this has contributed to the decline of church-going in Scotland.

 

Our response is not driven by numbers. At the heart of our faith, there is what is called the great commission, (Matthew Chapter 28 verses 16 – 20) which has compelled the Christian church throughout history to share the good news of Jesus. This means the church is always looking for opportunities to communicate the faith and that declining attendance has been accompanied by greater opportunity for faith sharing.

 

The Church of Scotland has taken a number of positive actions to foster growth. We have created five new pioneer ministries in areas as diverse as the farming community of Ayrshire, the arts community of Glasgow, the student community of Stirling, the inner-city community of Paisley and a new housing development in East Lothian.  Our ‘Path of Renewal’ initiative, which is helping 40 congregations engage with today’s world in news ways has proved so successful that 40 more congregations are being invited to join. Another exciting new development is the growing enthusiasm for Pilgrimage, a way to worship that appeals to many people today.

 

Alongside this the Church continues to produce resources to help people share their faith, be more confident in their faith and deepen their understanding of faith. The primary task of the church has not changed throughout the ages, but the way we tackle that task continues to evolve.

 

In the midst of decline you can find growth and in the midst of growth you can find decline. That is how it has always been.’

 

BBC News (2017)

Dramatic drop in church attendance in Scotland

 

The number of people who regularly attend church services in Scotland has fallen by more than half over the last 30 years, according to a new survey.

 

A census of Scottish Christians found that there are around 390,000 regular churchgoers north of the border, down from 854,000 in 1984.

 

The research also revealed that 42% of churchgoers were aged over 65.

One leading cleric said the findings presented a ‘crisis and an opportunity’ for Christians in Scotland.

 

The statistics were revealed in the results of 2016 Scottish Church Census, which was recently published by Brierley Consultancy.

 

Other key findings include:

§7.2% of Scotland's population regularly attend church, down from 17% in 1984;

§The number of congregations dropped from 4,100 in 1984 to 3,700 in 2016;

§40% of churchgoers are male;

§Four-fifths of church leaders (79%) are male, with an average age of 57;

§43% of leaders are responsible for more than one church.

 

Lead researcher Dr Peter Brierley said the figures indicated a crisis in Christianity across Scotland.

 

‘We are living in the 21st century and one of the features of the 21st century is that people's allegiance to particular faiths is no longer as strong as it used to be,’ he said. an opportunity

He said the main reason for the decline in church attendance was the deaths of elderly churchgoers.

 

‘Part of the problem is the proportion of people in the church who are elderly is much greater than in the population of Scotland as a whole,’ he said.

 

‘So, you have a great number of churchgoers dying. The rate of replacement is not as many. That's the basic reason for decline.

 

‘It's not that people are moving away from the faith, although I'm sure some are, but in general terms that is not the case.

 

‘There are also quite a lot of invisible Christians who used to go to church, still believe in God, but they have moved house, perhaps to a rural area, and simply haven't found a church to go to.

 

The census also revealed growth among some denominations in some parts of Scotland.

 

Attendance among the Pentecostals has doubled since 2002 and now stands at 19,000, making up 5% of all churchgoers in Scotland.

 

The census also revealed a growth in new churches - 12,000 people regularly attend around 300 new churches started since 2002.

 

Researchers said many immigrant churches and so-called ‘Messy Churches’, which are more informal gatherings, account for much of the new growth.

 

They credit a 2% growth in church attendance in Aberdeenshire to the influx of a large number of Polish migrants, mostly Roman Catholic, to the oil industry.

 

The Reverend Dr David Pickering, Moderator of the United Reformed Church Synod of Scotland, said the census did not make ‘terribly happy reading’.

 

'Opportunity and challenge.'

He said: ‘It's a crisis and an opportunity. Both present themselves’.

 

‘The Scottish Church Census doesn't make terribly happy reading. But it also presents a new opportunity for the church to portray the love of God and the good news of Jesus in a new way for a new generation. That's an opportunity and a challenge for us.

 

‘Although I wish it were different, I think we must acknowledge that most congregations have more older people than younger, and most young people simply do not see the relevance of God, of Jesus, of the church, to their lives.

 

‘And, of course, there are now more things to do on Sundays than there were even a generation ago.

 

‘I think if the church doesn't respond [to the decline in numbers], it is a crisis. If it does respond and it embraces the situation, that's positive.’

 

The Bishop of Paisley, John Kennan, admitted he loses sleep over church attendance figures.

 

He said: ‘The real crisis that's going on is not that people aren't coming to us, it's that we've stopped going to them. It's a geographical and a human reality. Essentially, we've stopped being part of the homes and lives of ordinary people.

 

‘To be honest with you, I lose sleep over the declining numbers. If the numbers are declining because there's something we could be doing that we're not doing then that's something we should lose sleep over.

 

‘There's a sense that we could do this better if we thought about this, came together, and had some kind of a plan.

 

The Free Church of Scotland (2017)

Moderator Designate Responds to Scottish Church Census

 

Rev. Derek Lamont of St. Columba's Free Church and Moderator Designate, responds to the 2016 Scottish Church Census.  I sometimes think that the church’s response to declining numbers can be to panic – ‘change the message!’  Some would have us morph the Gospel into something different – more palatable to sophisticated, 21st Century ears! Cut out the bits that don’t fit! Give people something new, and bury that old rugged Cross.

 

The church in Scotland would do well to consider the recent findings about declining church attendances, but instead of being tempted to make excuses or think about re-inventing the Gospel we should wholeheartedly re-commit ourselves to introducing people to the life-giving and life transforming message of Jesus Christ. If He no longer matters to us, then He sure won’t matter to anyone outside of the Church. If we no longer believe He is relevant or offers His unique message of redeeming love to a cynical and broken world, then we will feel no compassion or love to introduce Him to others.

 

The Free Church has often been the object of mockery and derision in Scotland – a typecast parody – dull, black and negative - insular and judgemental. Doubtless, there is much for which we need to be forgiven – but we have also fought hard over the last decade during which some of the current research has been done, to bring the unchanging, living and powerful message of the Gospel to a new generation. It is living truth from the Living God, so will always be contemporary, cutting edge and supremely relevant.

 

So, as a Church, we want to reach out with His love – it is tough because the authority and love of Christ challenges the genesis of so many of the core values of our secular society – it is about ultimate truth, human value, image, identity, guilt and forgiveness, life and death, hope and despair: the big issues.

 

Yet, we know the reality of Christ’s forgiveness and transforming power in our own lives – even if we are often a poor reflection of what we should be. We rejoice in the growth of some Scottish churches as well as seeing Christianity flourish in many parts of the world, despite it being the object, in some places, of the severest persecution.

 

We are thankful to see this growth but also thankful for the growth within the Free Church. We have welcomed new congregations, planted new churches, witnessed people coming to faith and our overall membership is following an upward trajectory.

 

There is no room for complacency but we know where our hope lies for the future of the church. We have absolute confidence that Jesus Christ will build His Church and the gates of hell will not prevail.

 


 

Telegraph online (Cramb, 2017).

 

The number of people regularly attending church in Scotland has fallen by more than half in the last 30 years, according to a new survey.

 

The survey of Christians across the country found there are around 390,000 regular Sunday churchgoers, down from 854,000 in 1984.

 

The research also revealed that two fifths are over 65, prompting a warning that Christianity is ‘in crisis’ in Scotland.

 

The statistics were revealed by the 2016 Scottish Church Census, published by the Brierley Consultancy.

 

It shows that just 7.2 per cent of the population attend church on a regular basis, compared to 17 per cent in 1984, while the number of congregations has dropped by 400.

 

Other key findings include the fact that 40 per cent of churchgoers and nearly 80 per cent of church leaders are male.

 

Dr Peter Brierley, the lead researcher, said the figures indicated a crisis, adding: ‘We are living in the 21st century and one of the features of the 21st century is that people's allegiance to particular faiths is no longer as strong as it used to be.

 

‘Part of the problem is the proportion of people in the church who are elderly is much greater than in the population of Scotland as a whole.

 

‘So, you have a great number of churchgoers dying. The rate of replacement is not as many. That's the basic reason for decline.

 

‘It's not that people are moving away from the faith, although I'm sure some are, but in general terms that is not the case.

 

‘There are also quite a lot of invisible Christians who used to go to church, still believe in God, but they have moved house, perhaps to a rural area, and simply haven't found a church to go to.’

 

However, the census also revealed growth among some denominations, with attendance at Pentecostal churches almost doubling to 19,000 since 2002.

 

Aberdeenshire was the sole area bucking the downward trend with 350 more people attending church in 2016 compared with 2002.

 

This was credited to Polish immigrants working in the oil industry, with 25 Polish churches in Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire.

 

The Rev Dr David Pickering, Moderator of the United Reformed Church Synod of Scotland, said the census did not make ‘terribly happy reading’.

 

He added: ‘It's a crisis and an opportunity. Both present themselves.

 

‘It presents a new opportunity for the church to portray the love of God and the good news of Jesus in a new way for a new generation. That's an opportunity and a challenge for us.

 

‘Although I wish it were different, I think we must acknowledge that most congregations have more older people than younger, and most young people simply do not see the relevance of God, of Jesus, of the church, to their lives.

 

‘And, of course, there are now more things to do on Sundays than there were even a generation ago. I think if the church doesn't respond, it is a crisis. If it does respond and it embraces the situation, that's positive.’

 

The Bishop of Paisley, John Kennan, said he loses sleep over figures. ‘The real crisis that's going on is not that people aren't coming to us, it's that we've stopped going to them,’ he added. ‘It's a geographical and a human reality. Essentially, we've stopped being part of the homes and lives of ordinary people.

 

‘There's a sense that we could do this better if we thought about this, came together, and had some kind of a plan.’

 

Scottish Episcopal Church (2017)

 

The Most Rev David Chillingworth, Bishop of St Andrews, Dunkeld & Dunblane and Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church says:

 

‘The results of the 2016 Scottish Church Census are on some levels entirely predictable. Historic institutional churches are in decline across the developed world, particularly when seen against the ‘narrow band’ measurement of church attendance. The processes of secularisation are systemic in modern societies and are rooted in factors such as population mobility, an individualism which leads to a reluctance to commit and ever-widening ranges of choice. While we may wonder at the apparent success of churches in the developing world, the same inexorable process of change will in time have a similar effect on them as our societies become more globalised.

 

‘The challenge for faith communities in Scotland and elsewhere is to find ways in which churches can learn to survive and thrive in this kind of social context. Social change – and the Holy Spirit – are creating a situation where the status quo is no longer a ‘safe option’ and the challenge of change is unavoidable.

 

‘Of all the factors which have led to decline, one of the most obvious is a generational failure. The children and grandchildren of today’s churchgoers have not followed them into active membership.

 

‘But it is not all bad news or cries of ‘crisis’. The results of the 2016 Scottish Church Census offer some encouragement to churches. There is a slowing of decline and some signs of recovery.

 

‘If we are to ‘survive and thrive’, the way ahead will require prayerful faithfulness with hard work. It will need visionary and skilled leadership. It will be a long but also a rewarding road. Churches will look very different. Some suggest that there are particular values which will bring growth. But there is no alternative to a path of spiritual faithfulness lived with an outward-facing commitment to growth and with integrity of life, community and service. I believe that many congregations in the Scottish Episcopal Church are already on that journey.

 

‘Churches offer community and belonging in an age of individualism. They encourage people to explore the deepest issues of life in times which often seem troubled and alarming. Institutional patterns of religion may not hold the loyalty which they did in the past – but people everywhere are on journeys of spiritual exploration and yearn for spiritual experience.

 

‘In recent times, the Scottish Episcopal Church has had a renewed focus on mission. We are developing outward-facing, welcoming and inclusive patterns of congregational life and offer attractive worship and engaging presentations of faith. We care for those in need and we have a passion for justice.

Appendix 8: Presbytery Planning Forms and Questions

Factor weighting scoring sheet

 


 

Example of scoring sheet for congregational size and strength

 


 

Parish population scoring sheet

 


 

Example of congregational attendance form

 

 

 

 

Example of mission audit question


 

Example of congregational audit form

 

 

 

 

Appendix 9: Congregational Datasets

 

Quantitative data relating historically to the local congregation of Kilsyth Anderson is. in some areas, plentiful but suffers from a lack of consistency, both in collection and in presentation.  Data is also scattered in that, where it does exist, it may be contained within formal or informal collections and not always held by a central person, body or at a singular location.  This diffuse nature to the existence of data means that it can be difficult to gather and attempt to correlate one set of numbers with another, having also to deal with missing data or data collected with changed procedures or understandings.  This haphazard method of handling valuable local information is a concern for anyone investigating historic trends and for the ability to properly understand the congregation and its component parts.

 

There are a number of primary formal sources of information available in the congregation.  The main sources would be minutes of Kirk Session meetings and meetings of the Board of Managers, along with minutes taken of meetings of the congregations as a whole.

 

The Kirk Session minute books, being available from 1881, means that it is theoretically possible to build a full and rich picture of the congregation over time and one might have hoped to discover in this record insight into trends within the congregation in relation to membership, attendance, baptisms, weddings and other events which shaped the congregation.  A number of problems were encountered in attempting to undertake this task.

 

Firstly, the nature and the quality of Kirk Session minutes were found to be highly variable.  In the early period (pre-world war two) the official written minutes were minimal in content.  It was often noted that meetings were held but aside from what was often routine and repetitive business (e.g. arrangements for communion services or holiday pulpit supply) nothing much beyond this was entered into the record.[1]

 

It is clear from references made in the minutes that statistical data was being gathered and regularly submitted to the relevant church authorities, as the following typical entry in the Kirk Session minute testifies,

 

The moderator reported having made the necessary return to the Presbytery Clerk regarding the statistical side of the church affairs and Christian liberality schedule[2] 

 

The statistics submitted would include a range of figures relating to church membership and church organisations, financial data was recorded separately.  The original data presented to presbytery and those sent to the church offices were later destroyed, except where figures were collated for the annual publications, such as the Year Book or for inclusion in the Reports of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, in these cases information was still available.

 

In the post-war period (after 1945) more regular statistical data was engrossed within the local Kirk Session minutes.  Whilst this, at times, this varied in the detail recorded it normally did include the total number of church members for each year.  Events relating to the movement of people in or out of the church roll, for example, profession of faith or death were also more consistently recorded.


 

Appendix 10: Worshipping Community Guidelines – Church of England

 

 Worshipping Community information sheet

 

The Worshipping Community questions were first introduced in the 2012 Statistics for Mission form as a means of trying to get a better indication of the size of the Church of England. Any drop in average weekly attendance could actually be reflecting a reduction in how often people come to church rather than a drop in the number of individuals who are regularly a part of the church. Whilst the electoral roll does include those individuals who are unable to attend services, for example, because they are too ill, but are still a committed part of a church, there are a number of other problems with this figure and how accurately it reflects the shape and size of the church.

 

Many dioceses already use this concept, and use a number of different terms to describe this including ‘participants’, ‘Agreed membership figure’, ‘members’, ‘declared members’, ‘regular worshipping community’, ‘active members’, ‘committed members’.

 

We are defining the ‘worshipping community’ to include anyone within your parish who attends your church, including fresh expressions (if they have not completed their own return), regularly, for example at least once a month, or would do so if not prevented by illness, infirmity or temporary absence. This includes all ages, but it is useful to count separately from adults (18+) those under 11 (primary) and those 11-17 (secondary). It includes activities such as fellowship groups and other activities which have a distinct act of worship or prayer. It also includes activities not on church premises (e.g. school or community centre).

 

We include those who:

• come to midweek services

• are ill and unable to come to church

• are away on holiday or business

• have home communions

• are part of a 'fresh expression' of church

• live in care or residential homes and would consider themselves to be full members of your church

• give regularly to the church

• lead worship (e.g. your clergy)

 

We do not include those who:

• are visitors - holidaymakers, baptism parties etc.

• are pupils attending school assemblies

• consider their 'home' church to be another church.

 

How do I accurately calculate my worshipping community? We know that many churches keep a list of those who come regularly and others of you who live in rural areas told us that you know each of your congregation well. If you do not have such a list you may start with your Electoral Roll as a base, in particular as a reminder of those unable to attend because of sickness or infirmity, then add other people to the figure if they attend regularly but are not on the roll. You may have a ‘prayer diary’ with current members, which is regularly updated and this might remind you of people who are unable to attend due to illness or who have recently died.

 

This year we have added an option to the joiners and leavers questions to reflect those who have transferred from or to a different local church. We would be very grateful if you could fill in as much as possible of this question. We realise it is sometimes difficult to know why people have left, so just use the ‘total leaving’ box if you can’t break it down and leave blank the individual parts. Thank you so much. With your help, we will be able to give a more true picture of the size of our Church.

 

If you have any queries or would like to discuss this question further, please email statistics.unit@churchofengland.org


 

Appendix 11: Congregational Annual Statistic Return 2017

 


Appendix 12: Regulations on Keeping Church Statistics

 

VI. COMMUNION ROLLS ACT (ACT VI 2000)

Edinburgh, 20th May 2000, Session 1

(incorporating Acts XXIII 1933, VI 1938 (as amended by Acts I 1972, IV 1977 and III 1991), and VI 1951 and Regulations IV 1964 and I 1996)

The General Assembly enact and ordain:–

 

Communion Rolls

1. There shall be a Communion Roll, made up and kept by the Kirk Session of every parish, containing the names and addresses of the communicants. A record shall be kept in this Roll of the dates:

(1) of enrolment

(a) by profession as First Communicants

(b) by receipt of Certificates of Transference

(c) by special resolution of the Kirk Session

(2) of removals

(a) by death

(b) by issue of Certificates of Transference

(c) by special resolution of Kirk Session.

2. For the purposes of attestation by the Presbytery, Communion Rolls kept manually shall be submitted in their entirety.

 

Communion Rolls on Computer

3. A Congregation’s Communion Roll may be kept on computer provided that an up-to-date printout of the Roll as at 31st December, duly attested by the Kirk Session, is produced at the annual inspection of records.

4. The printout shall contain the names and addresses, with date and manner of admission, of all members as at 31st December of the year under inspection. It shall also contain an appendix recording the names and addresses of people who have been removed from the Roll during the year, along with the date, reason and means of removal. The form and style of the printout shall be approved by the Superintendence Committee, or other committee appointed by the Presbytery for this purpose, before it first comes into use, and the committee shall report such approval to the Presbytery.

5. After attestation by the Presbytery, annual printouts shall be kept as historical records, and shall be preserved in a substantial loose-leaf binder, or permanently bound at intervals not exceeding ten years.

6. Kirk Sessions proposing to store data in a computer must ensure before doing so that the requirements of the Data Protection Act will be satisfied, and to this end they should record their intent with the Presbytery Clerk.

 

Certificates of Transference

7. A communicant’s name shall be transferred from the Communion Roll of one congregation to that of another congregation only by a Certificate of Transference, and 110

such certificate shall not entitle to enrolment after the expiry of one year from the date which it bears. A Kirk Session receiving a Certificate after the period of validity has expired shall investigate the circumstances carefully and may thereafter resolve to add the name of the person concerned to the Communion roll or to take such other action as it shall deem appropriate.

In the case of persons presenting Certificates of Transference, the date of enrolment shall be the date of lodging the certificate; and, in other cases, it shall be the date of the resolution of the Kirk Session to add the name to the Roll. The date of removal shall be the date of death, or the issue of a Certificate of Transference, or of a resolution of the Kirk Session to remove the name.

 

Annual Revision and Pastoral Oversight

8. The Kirk Session shall revise and attest the Communion Roll, as at 31st December in each year, the attestation to include a statement of the number of names on the Roll after revision, and shall at the same meeting make an entry in the Minutes that it did so. It is recommended that intimation be given from the pulpit on each of the two preceding Sundays that this procedure is to be taken.

9. At the annual revision of the Communion Roll the question of adherence to vows of Church membership shall be raised in the case of any person who during the year under review, without obvious and sufficient reason, has not, in the opinion of the Kirk Session, shown sufficient interest or taken an adequate share in the worship, mission and service of the Church. In the case of every such person whose address is known, the question shall be raised personally.

10. If any person with whom the question of adherence to vows has been raised does not respond in a manner satisfactory to the Kirk Session, the Kirk Session may remove the name of such person from the Communion Roll at the next annual revision. The names of persons whose names have been removed from the Roll under this Section shall be recorded in the Minutes and may be restored to the Roll only by resolution of the Kirk Session.

11. The Kirk Session, with a view to lessening the danger of lapsing from Church connection, shall issue to every member in full Communion when leaving, or immediately after leaving, the parish or district to take up residence elsewhere, a Certificate of Transference, unless the communicant has expressed a definite desire to retain his or her connection with the congregation and the minister and Kirk Session are prepared to accept pastoral responsibility for him or her; and, if their destination be known, shall intimate accordingly, either to the minister of the parish within which the communicant is going, or has gone, to reside, or to the Presbyterial Correspondent. Kirk Sessions receiving Certificates of Transference shall acknowledge receipt of the same to the Kirk Session which has issued them.

12. (1) The Kirk Session, with a view to continued supervision, shall keep a Supplementary Roll, on which shall be placed the names of those who have been removed from the Communion Roll without a Certificate of Transference and who continue to reside in the parish or district.

The Supplementary Roll shall be revised and attested annually.

(2) While persons whose names have been placed on the Supplementary Roll of a 111

congregation have had their names removed from the Communion Roll of that congregation, they are in no way debarred from being admitted to the Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper if they so desire, nor from being restored to the Communion Roll of a congregation by special resolution of the Kirk Session.

(3) Persons whose names have been placed on the Supplementary Roll are not eligible to be elected as office-bearers, nor to take part in, nor vote in Congregational Meetings. They may be admitted on application to the Electoral Register.

(4) Persons whose names are on the Supplementary Roll and who remove to another parish should have their names removed from the Roll and intimation sent to the minister of the parish to which they have gone to reside.

13. It is the duty of the Kirk Session to exercise pastoral care throughout the parish and to take due account of persons who have no connection with any Church.

 

 

 

Attestation by Presbytery

14. The Communion Roll and Supplementary Roll shall be submitted once a year to the Presbytery of the bounds for attestation, and Presbyteries are enjoined to see that each Kirk Session keeps a Communion Roll and Supplementary Roll in terms of this Act, and submits the same annually to the Presbytery.

15. Notwithstanding anything contained in this Act, access to the Lord’s Table shall not be refused to any person who desires to communicate, provided such person has previously been admitted a member in full communion and is not under discipline by a court of the Church.

16. The right of the Kirk Session to admit to the Lord’s Table a member of any Christian Church is expressly affirmed.

17. This Act shall come into force on 1 January 2001 and Acts XXIII 1933, VI 1938 (as amended by Acts I 1972, IV 1977 and III 1991), VI 1951 and Regulations IV 1964 and I 1996 shall be repealed as at that date. 112 113


 

Appendix 13: Church of England Statistics Reporting Form 2016

 


STATISTICS FOR MISSION: JANUARY TO DECEMBER 2016

Church name:

Parish name:

Deanery:

Diocese:

 

REMINDER: PLEASE COMPLETE THIS FORM ONLINE IF POSSIBLE http://parishreturns.churchofengland.org/

The online returns system has existing information about your church already saved. It automatically checks for typographical errors and minor mistakes and gives you the opportunity to revise your figures before final submission. You can see the data for your church over time and download copies for your records.

 

ü  Please complete this form for your CHURCH. If there is more than one church in your parish, then please complete and submit a separate form for each church

 

ü  Where activities – e.g. acts of worship in schools; conducting funeral services at crematoria - are shared between more than one church then please attempt, where possible, to ensure that they are only reported once

ü  Questions 1a and 1b about the Electoral Roll refer to the ecclesiastical electoral roll. Question 1a asks about the ecclesiastical electoral roll for your parish. Question 1b is optional and only applies if you are in a multi-church parish AND keep a separate roll for your church

ü  Fresh expressions of Church should be included in your numbers, unless they prefer to complete a separate return. For help in identifying fresh expressions of Church please visit http://www.freshexpressions.org.uk or use the ‘Choice tree’ at the end of this form

 

ü  Please complete all questions as far as possible, using ‘0’ or ‘unknown’ or ‘no services’ if necessary. Unless otherwise indicated, empty fields will be treated as incomplete and may be queried later as missing data

ü  In rare circumstances where a single congregation worships evenly between a number of churches (i.e. there is no difference in who attends and how often at each church), a single return may be submitted. The churches included in the return should be noted below

 

A single return is submitted on behalf of (please list all included churches here, with church codes if known):

 

 

 

 

 

1a. How many people were on the ecclesiastical electoral roll for your parish, as reported at your Annual Parochial Church meeting in 2016?

ü  Please write ‘unknown’ if the figure is not available

1a. Number on the ecclesiastical Electoral Roll for your PARISH

 

 

If your parish has more than one church and also keeps a separate roll for your church, please also provide the total electoral roll for your church.

ü  Please write ‘N/A’ if this is not applicable to your church

1b. How many people are on your church Electoral Roll?

1b. Number on the CHURCH Electoral Roll

 

 

The next question is about church attendance on a ‘USUAL’ SUNDAY

ü  A usual Sunday is one that is not a major festival or contained in a peak holiday period

ü  Wherever possible, please do not count the same person multiple times – if someone attends more than once on a usual Sunday, please only count them once

ü  Only think about the Sundays when you hold at least one service (ignore the Sundays when you do not hold a service at your church)

 

2. How many people attend your church on a usual Sunday, when there is a service?

2a. Adults (16 years old and over)

 

2b. Children and young people (under 16 years old)

 

 

The following questions are about how many people attended a service or act of worship at Easter (Easter Day and vigil services on Easter Eve), Advent (Advent Sunday until 23rd December) and Christmas (Christmas Eve and Christmas Day).

ü  If you did not hold any services or acts of worship at your church during these periods, please enter ‘0’ in the relevant box.

 

3. How many people came to your church at Easter 2016?

3a: Number of communicants at service(s) on Easter Day and vigil service on Easter Eve

 

3b. Total number of people attending worship (including communicants) at service(s) on Easter Day and vigil service on Easter Eve

 

 

4. How many people came to special services run by your church during Advent 2016?

ü  Include attendance at special services run by your church from Advent Sunday until 23rd December, for example nativities, carol services, carols on the green, crib services.

4a. Total number of people attending special services held for the congregation and local community

 

4b. Total number of people attending special services held specifically for civic organisations or schools

 

 

5. How many people came to your church at Christmas 2016?

5a. Number of communicants at service(s) on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day

 

5b. Total number of people attending worship (including communicants) at service(s) on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day

 

 

The next section is the OCTOBER COUNT of the number of people attending your church for services and other acts of worship in October. This includes the number of people attending on Sundays and during the week (Monday-Saturday).

 

ü  Please include any fresh expressions of Church, unless they have submitted their own return. A fresh expression of Church is a form of church established primarily for the benefit of people who are not yet ‘members’ of any church. For help identifying fresh expressions of Church, please visit http://www.freshexpressions.org.uk or use the ‘Choice tree’ at the end of this form

 

You are asked to enter a count for each of the first 4 weeks of October 2016. The count is split into Sundays and weekdays; adults and children; and type of service (Church, fresh expressions of Church and school services).

 

Wherever possible, please do not count the same person multiple times in the same week – if someone attends your church more than once during Sunday, please only count them once. If someone attends on a Sunday, please do not include them again in the midweek count for that week.

 

Number of services: The number of services held on Sundays and weekdays. Enter ‘0’ if there were none.

School services: These are services held in your church (or church building) that are attended by a school(s). There is a later question about acts of worship held in schools.

Adults: 16 years old and over. Please include those leading the service(s).

Children and young people: Under 16 years old.

Weekdays (Monday-Saturday): This should include people attending ONLY during the week and NOT on Sunday, i.e. if they have already attended a Sunday service, please try not to count them again if they attend another activity during the week

 

 

 


Please INCLUDE:

ü  Clergy and other ministers attending or leading services

ü  Adults and children attending Sunday schools or equivalent activities

ü  Attendance at baptisms, including any visitors

ü  Any other church-based activities in which worship is the primary purpose and predominant feature

ü  Attendance at Communion outside the church, for example in homes, prisons, or hospitals (include as Church or Fresh expression attendance, as appropriate)

 

Please DO NOT INCLUDE:

*       Attendance at weddings or funeral services

*      Activities with only some worship element, such as house groups, parent and toddler groups, youth clubs, Alpha courses, and social events such as harvest supper

 

6. How many people attended your church in October 2016?

ü  Please complete a count for each of the following four weeks

ü  Remember to count each person only once in any week, even if they attended more than once

ü  If there were exceptional circumstances that led to unusual October attendance figures in 2016, please let us know in the comment box at the end of this form

1.

Number of services

Adult

Children and young people

Church

Fresh expressions

School service

Church

Fresh expressions

School service

Sunday 2nd  October

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weekdays  3rd – 8th

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Number of services

Adult

Children and young people

Church

Fresh expressions

School service

Church

Fresh expressions

School service

Sunday 9th October

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weekdays 10th – 15th

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.

Number of services

Adult

Children and young people

Church

Fresh expressions

School service

Church

Fresh expressions

School service

Sunday 16th October

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weekdays 17th – 22nd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.

Number of services

Adult

Children and young people

Church

Fresh expressions

School service

Church

Fresh expressions

School service

Sunday 23rd October

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weekdays 24th– 29th

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. How often does your ministry team lead acts of worship in schools?

ü  This question refers to acts of worship in school buildings rather than in your church or church building (services held for schools in your church should be included within the October count, Easter or Christmas figures where appropriate)

ü  Please include any school-based acts of worship that are led by a person who holds office or responsibility for ministry within your church

ü  ‘Usually’ refers to during term-time or when the school is open, ignoring school holidays

ü  Please tick one box as the closest estimate

Never

Occasionally/ ad hoc

Usually once or twice a term

Usually once a month

Usually once a fortnight

Usually once a week

Usually more than once a week

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following questions are about your ‘worshipping community’. Think about your regular worshipping community at the end of 2016. For more information about worshipping communities, please refer to http://www.churchofengland.org/media/1529895/worshippingcommunityinfo.pdf

ü  Include anyone who attends your church regularly, for example at least once a month, or would attend if they were not prevented by illness, infirmity or temporary absence

ü  Include all congregations in your church, including fresh expressions of Church

*       Do not include visitors, e.g. holidaymakers, baptism parties etc.

*       Do not include people who consider their ‘home’ church to be another church

*       Do not include people who left the church earlier in the year (they are counted in the next question as ‘leavers’) and are not part of your worshipping community at the end of 2016

 

 

8. How many people are in your ‘worshipping community’ at the end of 2016?

ü  Please complete all of the boxes, as far as you can. If there is no-one in that category, please write ‘0’. If the age groups of your worshipping community are unknown, please enter the total figure only

TOTAL

Children
(Age 0-10)

Young people
(Age 11-17)

Adults
(Age 18-69)

Adults
(Age 70+)

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. How has your worshipping community changed during 2016?

ü  If you know how many people have left/joined your worshipping community but you do not know their reasons for leaving or joining, please enter the total figures (or your best estimates) only

ü  If there is no-one in a particular category, please write ‘0

ü  If you are unable to complete this question, please leave it blank

9a. How many adults and children joined your worshipping community during 2016?

 

TOTAL

Worshipping for the first time

Moved into the area

Moved from a local church

Returned to church

Adults (Age 18+)

 

 

 

 

 

Children and young people

 

 

 

 

 

 

9b. How many adults and children left your worshipping community during 2016?

 

TOTAL

Death or illness

Moved away

Moved to a local church

Not worshipping anywhere

Adults (Age 18+)

 

 

 

 

 

Children and young people

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next questions are about fresh expressions of Church. A fresh expression of Church is a form of Church established primarily for the benefit of people who are not yet ‘members’ of any church. Here you are asked to describe aspects of the way the fresh expression of Church is run, rather than providing numbers attending.

ü  For help in identifying fresh expressions of Church please visit http://www.freshexpressions.org.uk or use the ‘Choice tree’ at the end of this form

ü  Fresh expressions of Church can be quite varied. If you remain unsure about whether an activity or service meets the definition of a fresh expression, please DO include it here

ü  We have included space for three fresh expressions of Church. If you have more, please continue on an additional sheet

*       Do not include Alpha courses or outreach activities that do not include worship

 

10. What regular fresh expressions of Church are supported by your church?

No fresh expressions of Church (If your church did NOT hold fresh expressions of Church during 2016 please tick here and leave the rest of this page blank.)

 

Name of fresh expression

 

Description of activity

 

Where is it held? (please tick all that apply)

□ Church                                   □ Church Hall

□ Other (please note where): ______________________

How often?

□ Weekly                 □ Fortnightly                 □ Monthly                                

□ Quarterly              □ Other (please note how often):___________

Age group aimed at? (please tick all that apply)

□ ALL ages       □ Family         □ 0-4                □ 5-10

□ 11-17             □ 18-39          □ 40-69             □ 70+

Are attendees also worshippers at other services in your parish? (please tick all that apply)

□ Regular         □ Irregular       □ Previous attendees
□ Never           

 

Name of fresh expression

 

Description of activity

 

Where is it held? (please tick all that apply)

□ Church                                   □ Church Hall

□ Other (please note where): ______________________

How often?

□ Weekly                 □ Fortnightly                 □ Monthly                                

□ Quarterly              □ Other (please note how often):___________

Age group aimed at? (please tick all that apply)

□ ALL ages       □ Family         □ 0-4                □ 5-10

□ 11-17             □ 18-39          □ 40-69             □ 70+

Are attendees also worshippers at other services in your parish? (please tick all that apply)

□ Regular         □ Irregular       □ Previous attendees
□ Never           

 

Name of fresh expression

 

Description of activity

 

Where is it held? (please tick all that apply)

□ Church                                   □ Church Hall

□ Other (please note where): ______________________

How often?

□ Weekly                 □ Fortnightly                 □ Monthly                                

□ Quarterly              □ Other (please note how often):___________

Age group aimed at? (please tick all that apply)

□ ALL ages       □ Family         □ 0-4                □ 5-10

□ 11-17             □ 18-39          □ 40-69             □ 70+

Are attendees also worshippers at other services in your parish? (please tick all that apply)

□ Regular         □ Irregular       □ Previous attendees
□ Never           

 

11. How many baptisms and thanksgivings for the gift of a child were held in your church during 2016?

ü  If separate services of thanksgiving and baptism were held for an individual both should be recorded here

 

Infants
(<1 year)

Children
(1-4 years)

Children
(5-12 years)

Youth/ adults (13+)

Number of persons baptised

 

 

 

 

Number of children for whom a thanksgiving service for the gift of a child (birth or adoption) was held

 

 

 

 

 

 

12. How many marriages and services of prayer and dedication after civil marriage were held in your church during 2016?

Number of couples married in your church

 

Number of couples for whom a service of prayer and dedication was held in your church (after civil marriage)

 

 

13. How many funeral services were held at or on behalf of your church during 2016?

ü  Include all funerals that were held at your church

ü  Include all funerals conducted by any member of your ministry team (including Readers, stipendiary clergy, non-stipendiary clergy and retired clergy) at a crematorium or cemetery

*       Do not include services that performed only a burial of ashes or only a committal

Number of deceased for whom a funeral service was held at your church

 

Number of deceased for whom a full funeral service was conducted by a member of your ministry team at a crematorium or cemetery, excluding committal only and burial of ashes only

 

 

 

Finally, there is a special focus question about visitors to your church. In the following questions, by visitors we mean people coming into your church for reasons other than to attend services or to attend a particular group or activity (e.g. reasons for visiting would include coming to see the building and/or its artefacts; private prayer or reflection).

 

14a. How often is your church open to visitors outside of service times?

ü  Please tick one box as the closest estimate.

Never

Occasionally/ ad hoc

About 1-2 days a month

About 1-2 days each week

About 3-4 days each week

5 or more days each week

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14b. For how many hours in a typical week (not including service times) is your church unlocked and open to visitors?

Number of hours the church is open to visitors in a typical week

 

 

14c. During a typical week, approximately how many visitors come to your church?

Number of visitors in a typical week

 

Tick here if you are unable to estimate this figure

 

 

Thank you for completing your annual return on behalf of your church. Please take a moment to review your answers. Make sure that you have completed every question as far as possible and not left any answers blank (use ‘0’ or ‘unknown’ or ‘no services’ if necessary), aside from where instructed in question 9. Other blank answers may be queried with you later.

Please record below the contact details for the person who has completed this form (or the lead person if more than one individual has helped with the return).

 

Name:                                                                         Position:

 

email address:                                                             Date of completion:

 

Looking back across 2016, were there any exceptional circumstances (e.g. an interregnum or building works) or significant changes that may have led to unusual figures in this return?

 

 

Is there anything additional that we should note when including your annual return within the Statistics for Mission?

 

 

 

Thank you for taking the time to complete this form. Your contribution is essential to the on-going care and understanding of our churches and congregations; your diligence, time, and effort are greatly appreciated.


 

Appendix 14: Sample Church of England Output




[1] Deaths, resignations and replacement organs being further examples of what might be occasional items.

[2] Kilsyth Anderson Kirk Session extract January 24th 1937